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A nice IC case by Sanjay Anandaram

Just want to share you with an IC case that I read from the web recently about Michael Jackson.
“In the 1988 video of the song Smooth Criminal, the pop star and his dancers leaned forward dramatically, seemingly defying gravity. It turns out Jackson didn’t just invent the move — he eventually patented it. To do what became a signature move in live performances without the help of harnesses and wires, Jackson created a shoe “system” called “Method and Means for Creating Anti-Gravity Illusion.” Granted in 1993 to Jackson and two partners by the U.S. Patent and Trade Office, patent No. 5,255,452 covers a “system for allowing a shoe wearer to lean forwardly beyond his center of gravity by virtue of wearing a specially designed pair of shoes.” A heel slot in the shoes gets hitched to retractable pegs in a stage floor. Wearing the shoes, Jackson (or anyone) could seem to lean past his center of gravity without toppling.
Sanjay Anandaram suggested two points here, firstly, the objective of patent was to create marketing buzz by promoting exclusivity and increasing reputation. Secondly, He believes it is important for all to understand the value of Michael’s invention (Sanjay Anandaram, 2009), that also makes a unique Michael.

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  1. Amy says

    Method and Means for Creating Anti-Gravity Illusion.” Granted in 1993 to Jackson and two partners by the U.S. Patent and Trade Office — that means his ‘steps’ is being patent-protected. Any practices being exercised to protect MJ’s patent right?

  2. TS says

    I know patent is important in the business world, but I just can’t help being a bit skeptical about patents especially when they have got too far. People just patent anything and are granted. Patent a move?

  3. teresa says

    That is the signature move which shocked the world and because “the move” actually generate profit, it should be treated as other clever “ideas” (IC) and be protected.



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